Works & Prices
Exhibitions

Landscape, so Beautiful!

The Representation of Nature in Painting and Photography

To say it right away: our title “Landscape, so Beautiful!” should be understood with a dash of irony…. And yet the representation of nature in art has a long history, it already exists in antiquity. In the modern sense, it begins in the late Middle Ages, on the threshold of the Renaissance. Famous is the ascent of Mont Ventoux in Provence by the writer Petrarch in 1336, who reflects himself in the perception of nature:

“And men go to marvel at the heights of the mountains, the immense floods of the sea, the broadly flowing streams, the vastness of the ocean, and the courses of the stars, and forget themselves over them.” (Confessiones X, 8)

This subjective perception of nature in an aesthetic-reflexive sense is then to be found again in the landscape representations of the Baroque, especially the Dutch-Flemish painting of the 17th century, and the Romantic period – both epochs are still of great influence today. But two developments do not permit an unreflected continuation of this tradition.

boscotrecase-pompeii_busche-kunst
Fresco in the Boscotrecase Villa, Pompeii

On the one hand, there is climate change, which threatens our existence: forest dieback and glacier melt, wildfires and floods shall suffice as keywords. Even if these events are rarely addressed in art, they are very much present in the consciousness of artists, particularly younger ones. They influence their work, even if it is not obvious. In our selection, a hint of this is most likely to be found in the morass of “Reduit” by Roland Boden.

The other reason is the general development of modern art: all artistic upheavals have naturally affected the representation of landscape, from the dissolution of the subject into point grids with the Pointillists or into color fields with the Expressionists, to the disintegration with the Cubists.

Finally to complete abstraction, beginning with Kandinsky and continuing through Mondrian to the American Abstract Expressionists. Finally, the Symbolists and Surrealists transformed the landscape into a mirror of the psyche.

landscape, so beautiful!

All of this is reflected in the representation of nature in the 21st century, and our exhibition is an apt example. The landscape is most naturalistic in photography, for example in the photograph of the Tempelhof airfield by Maximilian Meisse. But already his series of “Unreached Landscape” shows it just as such: the beautiful mountain sceneries are distant and unreachable – and the golden frame underlines the preciousness of this stretch of nature.

The photorealistic plant jungle of Jens Hausmann has a slightly surreal-fantastic effect, as it is similarly found in Joanna Buchowska, Grigori Dor, Florian Pelka, Janes Haid-Schmallenberg, Victoria Pidust and Marina Roca Die. This young Spanish painter even presents us a human body as “landscape” (“Lethargy II”). Gilles Roudière‘s photos also play on this keyboard with their hard chiaroscuro effects.

Mondrian_Grey-tree_busche-kunst
Piet Mondrian, Grey Tree, 1911. Gemeente Museum, The Hague

Midway between figuration and abstraction are the icebergs of Torben Giehler, the plant worlds of Juliette Sturlèse, “Engelberg” – a place in central Switzerland – by Nicholas Kashian, the “Pink Painting (Landscape #4)” by Doris Marten and the constructivist entity called “Pink” by Isabelle Borges.

Christine Krämer‘s entirely abstract paintings refer to a natural context only with their associative titles “Coral Sea” and “Birdland”, whereas Daniel Grüttner‘s “Azzurro” immediately suggests Italy’s charming blue skies and seas.

Most realistic in painting appears Henri Haake‘s “Sternegucker (Stargazer),” which is entirely in the tradition of Romanticism and, with its black, starless sky, also adopts its penchant for symbolism. But here, as in most of the other works, it should be clear that the somewhat euphemistic title of this show, “Landscape, So Beautiful,” is to be taken literally only with qualification….

As usual, the works shown here can also be found on the individual artists’ pages, where you can enlarge the works for detailed viewing. Henri Haake, Maximilian Meisse and Gilles Roudière have kindly provided works that are not in their portfolio. And we welcome Torben Giehler as a guest in this exhibition.

Exhibits

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Roland Boden

  • Reduit, 2018
    oil on canvas, 200 x 150 cm
    12.000 Euro

Isabelle Borges

  • Pink, 2018
    acrylic on canvas, 125 x 75 cm
    5.200 Euro

Joanna Buchowska

  • t. d. a. 2, 2015
    oil on canvas, 140 x 160 cm
    4.800 Euro
  • t. d. a. 3, 2015
    oil on canvas, 140 x 150 cm
    4.600 Euro
  • d. e. e. k., 2016
    Oil on canvas, 56 x 56 cm
    1.750 Euro
  • vfnb.town, 2018
    various papers, acrylic, ink, gaffa tape on canvas,150 x 250 cm
    8.000 Euro

Grigori Dor

  • Still Life With Two Red Lights, 2019
    oil on canvas, 180 x 140 cm
    6.900 Euro
  • Landscape With An Orchid, 2020
    oil on canvas, 180 x 140 cm
    6.900 Euro

Torben Giehler

  • 14.VII.2020, 2020
    oil on canvas, 90 x 110 cm
    13.000 Euro
  • 19.VI.2020, 2020
    oil on canvas, 90 x 110 cm
    13.000 Euro

Daniel Grüttner

  • Azzurro, 2020
    oil on canvas, 120 x 140 cm
    5.600 Euro

Henri Haake

  • Der Sternengucker, 2018
    oil on canvas, 150 x 185 cm
    private collection

Jens Hausmann

  • The Garden - Et in Arcadia Ego, 2014/2019
    oil on canvas, three parts, 300 x 340 cm
    33.000 Euro

Nicholas Kashian

  • Engelberg, 2013
    acrylic and oil on canvas, 150 x 130 cm
    4.300 Euro

Christine Krämer

  • Coral Sea, 1989
    oil on cotton duck, 160 x 120 cm
    4.800 Euro
  • Birdland, 1996
    oil on cotton duck, 160 x120 cm
    4.800 Euro

Doris Marten

  • Pink Painting (Landscape N° 4), 2012
    oil on cotton, 150 x 200 cm
    12.600 Euro

Maximilian Meisse

  • Tempelhof Airport, Airfield IV, 2007
    ed. 5 + 1 a.p., fine art print on diasec, 130 x 200 cm
    4.370 Euro
  • Traunsee I, from the series Unreached Landscapes, 2014
    ed. 5 + 1 a.p., fine art print, guilded wood frame, museum glass, 110 x 80 cm
    2.270 Euro
  • Südtirol I, from the series Unreached Landscapes, 2019
    ed. 5 + 1 a.p., fine art print, guilded wood frame, museum glass, 110 x 80 cm
    2.270 Euro
  • Südtirol II, from the series Unreached Landscapes, 2019
    ed. 5 + 1 a.p., fine art print, guilded wood frame, museum glass, 110 x 80 cm
    2.270 Euro

Florian Pelka

  • I, Zeus, 2004
    oil on canvas, 170 x 210 cm
    8.000 Euro
  • Die And Become, 2017
    oil on canvas, 200 x 270 cm
    9.800 Euro

Victoria Pidust

  • Winter Palm, Hybrid Series, 2020
    digital collage, inkjet print on paper, 200 x 150 cm
    1.800 Euro
  • Athens, More Than All Series, 2019
    digital collage, inkjet print on alu-dibond, 135 x 200 cm
    1.800 Euro

Marina Roca Die

  • Is This Love Or Summer? I, 2018
    oil on canvas, 140 x 80 cm
    4.000 Euro
  • Lethargy II, 2018
    oil on canvas, 50 x 70 cm
    1.200 Euro
  • Sacred Secret, 2019
    oil on canvas, 70 x 100 cm
    2.400 Euro

Gilles Roudière

  • Greece, from the series Volta no vento, 2016
    ed. 12 all sizes, pigment print, 70 x 100 cm, also 30 x 40 cm, 40 x 60 cm, 50 x 70 cm
    1.500 Euro
  • Portugal I, from the series Volta no vento, 2020
    ed. 12 all sizes, pigment print, 70 x 100 cm, also 30 x 40 cm, 40 x 60 cm, 50 x 70 cm
    1.500 Euro
  • Portugal II, from the series Volta no vento, 2020
    ed. 12 all sizes, pigment print, 70 x 100 cm, also 30 x 40 cm, 40 x 60 cm, 50 x 70 cm
    1.500 Euro

Juliette Sturlèse

  • Jungle Peak District 3, 2017
    oil on canvas, 200 x 210 cm
    7.800 Euro
  • Autumn Spell, 2019
    oil on canvas, 200 x 160 cm
    6.800 Euro
  • Why Are You Crying? - Because I Dont Like the Snow - You Shouldn’t Cry Because of the Snow, 2018
    oil on canvas, 200 x 210 cm
    7.800 Euro